Friday, December 13, 2013

AC and the Short Form — Part 3

One nice thing about well-written short stories—the author can't afford any clutter—and Agatha Christie was very good at keeping them uncluttered.

THE UNDERDOG AND OTHER STORIES (1951):
Nine Hercule Poirot cases, 1923-26 vintage, none ever previously in book form in these parts. - Here are the little gray cells getting oiled up. Hypnosis, insanity, weed-killer, and blood abound. - Verdict: For auld lang syne. — THE SATURDAY REVIEW (October 20, 1951)
DOUBLE SIN AND OTHER STORIES (1961):
Octet of tales, one medium long, includes quartet starring Poirot, while Miss Marple shines in two. Pleasant change of pace. — Sergeant Cuff, THE SATURDAY REVIEW (August 26, 1961)
THIRTEEN CLUES FOR MISS MARPLE (1966):
This baker's dozen of tales reassembles a fine cluster, in each unit of which the busy knitter of St. Mary Mead who enjoys private-eyeing produces a crime-solving gimmick. — Sergeant Cuff, THE SATURDAY REVIEW (October 29, 1966)
HERCULE POIROT: THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES (2013):
This collection of stories runs to nearly 900 pages, and it really is not the kind of book you want to sit down and read cover to cover. It is far better to dip into the book when you feel the need for a good, well-constructed mystery that can be read and digested in anywhere from a few minutes to an hour or two. These are stories to savor about a detective who today, nearly a century after his first appearance in print remains a favorite with readers all around the world. — Les Blatt, CLASSIC MYSTERIES (December 2, 2013)
Part 1 here - Part 2 here.

Category: Detective fiction

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